Know more

Our use of cookies

Cookies are a set of data stored on a user’s device when the user browses a web site. The data is in a file containing an ID number, the name of the server which deposited it and, in some cases, an expiry date. We use cookies to record information about your visit, language of preference, and other parameters on the site in order to optimise your next visit and make the site even more useful to you.

To improve your experience, we use cookies to store certain browsing information and provide secure navigation, and to collect statistics with a view to improve the site’s features. For a complete list of the cookies we use, download “Ghostery”, a free plug-in for browsers which can detect, and, in some cases, block cookies.

Ghostery is available here for free: https://www.ghostery.com/fr/products/

You can also visit the CNIL web site for instructions on how to configure your browser to manage cookie storage on your device.

In the case of third-party advertising cookies, you can also visit the following site: http://www.youronlinechoices.com/fr/controler-ses-cookies/, offered by digital advertising professionals within the European Digital Advertising Alliance (EDAA). From the site, you can deny or accept the cookies used by advertising professionals who are members.

It is also possible to block certain third-party cookies directly via publishers:

Cookie type

Means of blocking

Analytical and performance cookies

Realytics
Google Analytics
Spoteffects
Optimizely

Targeted advertising cookies

DoubleClick
Mediarithmics

The following types of cookies may be used on our websites:

Mandatory cookies

Functional cookies

Social media and advertising cookies

These cookies are needed to ensure the proper functioning of the site and cannot be disabled. They help ensure a secure connection and the basic availability of our website.

These cookies allow us to analyse site use in order to measure and optimise performance. They allow us to store your sign-in information and display the different components of our website in a more coherent way.

These cookies are used by advertising agencies such as Google and by social media sites such as LinkedIn and Facebook. Among other things, they allow pages to be shared on social media, the posting of comments, and the publication (on our site or elsewhere) of ads that reflect your centres of interest.

Our EZPublish content management system (CMS) uses CAS and PHP session cookies and the New Relic cookie for monitoring purposes (IP, response times).

These cookies are deleted at the end of the browsing session (when you log off or close your browser window)

Our EZPublish content management system (CMS) uses the XiTi cookie to measure traffic. Our service provider is AT Internet. This company stores data (IPs, date and time of access, length of the visit and pages viewed) for six months.

Our EZPublish content management system (CMS) does not use this type of cookie.

For more information about the cookies we use, contact INRA’s Data Protection Officer by email at cil-dpo@inra.fr or by post at:

INRA
24, chemin de Borde Rouge –Auzeville – CS52627
31326 Castanet Tolosan CEDEX - France

Dernière mise à jour : Mai 2018

Menu INRA Logo partenaire

Home page

SPIC : environmental Stresses and Processes Involved in the Control of growth

D. Vile, B. Muller, M. Dauzat, G. Rolland, A. Bédiée (past member : C. Granier)

The main objective of the SPIC group is to analyse and model the circuitry that links the different levels of plant organization in response to environmental factors. Our multi-scale approach include whole plant growth and phenology, leaf expansion, root development, flowering, cell production, cell expansion, endoreduplication, in pace with physiological (carbon metabolism, hydraulics) and molecular modules. We illustrated in a few recent studies, that taking into account environmental and temporal variation of the phenotype and considering the phenotype at different levels of integration, i.e. from subcellular, cellular, tissue, organ to whole plant level, enhances our understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationships. The phenotype cannot be restricted to one trait characterising a genotype. A genotype at a given stage or date, in a precise environmental context is characterised by a whole set of morphological, structural, physiological and biochemical traits.

Resolving the ‘many-to-many’ relationships involved in the genotype-to-phenotype map requires advanced mathematical and statistical methods. In Arabidopsis thaliana, we use natural variation, population of recombinant inbred lines, and mutants to test these relationships. Univariate statistical methods remain useful for hypothesis testing on single traits, but in many studies we emphasize the importance of considering the covariations between traits, such as trade-offs and allometries, in order to avoid confounding effects and misinterpretation especially when these covariations change with ontogeny or with the environment.

SPIC-2017-web

Significant publications:

Roucou A, Violle C, Fort F, Roumet P, Ecarnot M and Vile D. Shifts in plant functional strategies over the course of tetraploid wheat domestication. Journal of Applied Ecology (online early). DOI: 10.1111/1365-2664.13029

Lièvre M., Granier C., Guédon Y. (2016) Identifying developmental phases in Arabidopsis thaliana rosette using integrative segmentation models. New Phytologist. 210, 1466-1478.

Bresson J., Vasseur F., Dauzat M., Koch G., Granier C., Vile D. (2015) Quantifying spatial heterogeneity of chlorophyll fluorescence during plant growth and in response to water stress. Plant Methods, 11 (1), 23.

Granier C., Vile D. (2014) Phenotyping and beyond: modelling the relationships between traits. Current Opinion in Plant Biology. 18, 96-102

Vasseur F., Bontpart T., Dauzat M., Granier C. & Vile D. (2014) Multivariate genetic analysis of plant responses to water deficit and high temperature revealed contrasted adaptive strategies. Journal of Experimental Botany. 65 (22) 6457-6469.

Lièvre M., Wuyts N., Cookson S.J., Bresson J., Dapp M., Vasseur F., Massonnet C., Tisne S., Bettembourg M., Balsera C., Bédiée A., Bouvery F., Dauzat M., Rolland G., Vile D. & Granier C. (2013) Phenotyping the kinematics of leaf development in flowering plants: recommendations and pitfalls. WIREs Developmental Biology 2: 809-821.

Pantin F., Fanciullino A.L., Massonnet C., Dauzat M., Simonneau T., Muller B. (2013) Buffering growth variations against water deficits through timely carbon usage. Frontiers in Plant Sciences 4: 483.

Baerenfaller K., Massonnet C., Walsh S., Baginsky S., Bühlmann P., Hennig L., Hirsch-Hoffmann M., Howell K. A., Kahlau S., Radziejwoski A., Russenberger D., Rutishauser D., Small I., Stekhoven D., Sulpice R., Svozil J., Wuyts N., Stitt M., Hilson P., Granier C. & Wilhelm G.  (2012) Systems-based analysis of Arabidopsis leaf growth reveals adaptation to water deficit. Molecular Systems Biology 8: 606.

 

Main funding sources

Our main funding sources are INRA, SUPAGRO, Languedoc Roussillon (APSEVIR project), Agropolis Fondation (3D-leaf and tomates projects), ANR (Drought Natural Variation, CKI-Stress, PHENOME Projects), l’Europe (AgronOmics; AgWaterBreed, EPPN, Root Barriers, ModCarbostress projects).

Main collaborations:

Max Planck Institutes in Koln (M. Koornneef), in Golm (M. Stitt) and Tübingen (D. Weigel)

Gent University (L. de Veylder)

ETH Zurich (K. Baerenfaller, W. Gruissem)

Juelich Plant Phenotyping Center (R. Pieruchka, F. Fiorani)

Warsaw University (W. Rymaszewski)

Massachusetts University (S. Hazen)

Lancaster University (W.J. Davies)

BPMP Montpellier (P. Nacry, C. Maurel, F. Gosti)

CEFE Montpellier (C. Violle)

BGPI Montpellier (M. Van Munster)

Virtual Plant team Montpellier (Y. Guédon)

INRA BFP Bordeaux (C. Chevalier, J.P. Renaudin, C. Cheniclet)

INRA PSH Avignon (N. Bertin, V. Baldazzi)

CNRS IBMP Strasbourg (P. Genschik)

Researchers of the SPIC group